Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Jay-Z and Nas. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Jay-Z and Nas. Sort by date Show all posts

Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Jay-Z vs Nas - What Really Happened


The feud between Nas and JAY-Z was a gladiatorial battle between two rap titans. They started off with subliminal jabs and moved up to body sh*ts. Fans cheered on. Crews got in the mix. Digs got so personal that parents had to step in. Thankfully, the battle didn't end in tragedy like Biggie vs. 2Pac. It ended in triumph. And friendship. JAY-Z and Nas would later shake hands and join forces.

Carmen Bryan opened up to VladTV in an exclusive interview about being at the center of Jay Z and Nas' legendary beef. She explained that after breaking up with and moving away from Nas, she started dating Jay Z after first becoming friends.

During the conversation, Carmen shut down rumors that Memphis Bleek started the beef, as she said she feels bad for Bleek and blames Jay Z for ending his career. Carmen also revealed that she confronted both Jay Z and Nas about the beef.

Thursday, April 8, 2021

Would You Like To See A Nas And Jay-Z Collaborate Again?

 


The history of Jay-Z and Nas beef will be talked about for years to come. It seems like it was just yesterday when Nas and Jay-Z were involved in the what some may call the greatest Hip-Hop battle of all time.


It seems that Jay-Z and Nas have put all of that behind them. In 2006, Nas was good enough for Jay-Z to sign him to a $3 Million dollar record deal. Even Fat Joe and Jim Jones have a long-standing history with JAY-Z, having beefed with him in the early 2000s.


Until we hear otherwise, let's look at past Jay-Z and Nas collaborations and beef and talk in today's terms. What if they were to collaborate again in the near future. Do you think they would produce there best work yet? Or do you feel it would only end up as it did the first time?


Comment your answers and thoughts on the comment section below!


See more from Jay-Z


See more from Nas

Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Did Nas & Jay-Z Have The Biggest Rap Beef Ever?


For a time, the intracity rivalry between Jay-Z and Nas appeared destined to end. The seeds of dispute were planted in 1996, when Nas failed to appear at a recording session for Jay's legendary debut album, Reasonable Doubt. Nas's sophomore record, released weeks after Jay's debut, included at least one line "inspired" by his rival.

The beef took another step in 1997 when Jay-Z anointed himself New York City's best MC following the death of The Notorious B.I.G. In 1999, Jay-Z associate Memphis Bleek took aim at Nas, and in 2001, Jay ripped into the Queensbridge product on "Takeover," a track from his sixth album The Blueprint. 

Friday, November 27, 2020

Who's Album Was Better? Jay-Z - The Blueprint or Nas - Stillmatic

 


The Jay-Z vs. Nas beef was a gladiatorial battle between two rap titans. For almost a decade, two of rap's most decorated emcees went at each other's throat.


At one point, they even took a poll about the beef, with 58% of listeners saying they preferred “Ether” to “Supa Ugly”. The consensus seemed to point to Nas as the winner. “Ether” has since become an emblematic diss track, with rappers reinterpreting it for their beef purposes.


Jay Z and Nas' feud was sparked over a Memphis Bleek lyric in 2000's 'My Mind Right', causing the rapper to respond to both Bleek and Jay Z on future mixtape tracks. The feud escalated further when Jay Z called Nas "lame" on 2001's 'The Takeover', prompting Nas to take aim at Jay on 'Ether'. The beef continued in this wild manner until they ended it publicly at the 'I Declare War' concert in Philadelphia in 2005.

Thursday, May 21, 2020

What Would A Battle Between DMX And Jay-Z Be Like?


Before DMX and Jay Z became international rap titans, they competed in a classic hip-hop war. Even with all that feuding in the past, Hov and X have collaborated on a bunch of songs, including "It's Murda" and "Blackout." They even almost formed a group with Ja Rule.

In 1999, Jay Z and DMX embarked (and majorly cashed in) on the Hard Knock Life Tour. Although Jay Z’s album gave the tour its name, the lineup was a joint headliner of the Roc-A-Fella Records co-founder and DMX.

Captured in the documentary film Backstage, Jay Z and DMX had vastly different demeanors on wax, on stage, and as celebrities. While both were pillars of Rap-made-right and suddenly sex symbols, they only overlapped in skill and love of the art.

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Jay-Z And Nas Team For Epic Video

 


On Friday, April 30th, Hype Williams will premiere a new music video for the song “Sorry Not Sorry” starring Jay-Z, and Nas.


This is an incredible feat as both rappers are considered in different rap genealogies to be the best rappers to ever touch the mic and there have been rumors of friction between camps dating back to the late 90s or early 2000s.

Saturday, September 26, 2020

Ohio Producer Enlist Jay-Z, Eminem, Master P, Wu Tang and Nas as his Top 5 Favorite Rappers

 


Lima, Ohio music producer and artist Gansta Marcus has listed his top five favorite artist of all time.

'These are not just my favorite rappers just because of the music they make, but also how there fans stay loyal. I am apart of various Facebook groups, so I can see what's going on inside the minds of music lovers.'

'Not only that, I am a PR for the website Wrap-Up Magazine. So when I create articles for these musicians, I can see one on one which artist has the most engagement and connection to fans.'

When asked who would be considered as his favorite rappers of all time, Gansta Marcus replied: 'There has been many artist over the decade who have come and gone. But none have stood out like Jay-Z, Eminem, Master P, Wu Tang and Nas for various odd reasons.'

Monday, November 9, 2020

The Notorious B.I.G. honored by Jay-Z, Nas, Diddy & more

 


Depeche Mode, Nine Inch Nails, The Notorious B.I.G., T. Rex, Whitney Houston and The Doobie Brothers were all inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame on Saturday (11/7) during a virtual ceremony that's rewatchable on HBO Max.


Biggie was inducted by his longtime producer and Bad Boy Records label boss Diddy, who said, "Big just wanted to be biggest, he wanted to be the best, he wanted to have influence and impact people in a positive way, and that clearly has been done all over the world. Nobody has come close to the way Biggie sounds, to the way he raps, to the frequency that he hits. Tonight we are inducting the greatest rapper of all time into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame."


The Biggie segment also included archival interview and performance footage of Big, and Jay-Z, Nas, Lin-Manuel Miranda, and Biggie's family members also spoke about him as well.

Saturday, March 13, 2021

Is Nas The Next Billionaire?

 


We now know that Nas is a smart guy. We always knew he was gonna do, but traditional standards suggested maybe he isn’t the smartest guy, because he didn’t finish traditional school institutions. We also know about “they” schools. We have been able to ascertain that NAS is about to be the next billionaire!


It’s been made public for quite some time now that Nas is an investor in many tech companies and has a vast portfolio. That portfolio has resulted in numerous deals, which have lined the rapper’s pockets. So, Nas will invest in a company and the company gets sold, kind of like Tidal or Verzuz, and then those that helped that company get a higher valuation get paid in full.

Sunday, February 14, 2021

#Throwback Eminem, Jay Z - Renegade

 


"Renegade" is a song by rapper Jay-Z, which appears as the 12th track on his sixth album The Blueprint. The song is written by Jay-Z, Eminem, and Luis Resto.


Eminem, who is the only guest appearance on the album with rap verses also produced the track. It was originally a collaboration between Eminem and Royce da 5'9" as part of the Bad Meets Evil series, but Royce was later replaced by Jay-Z.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Jay-Z, Diddy, Nas back McGuire for NYC mayor

 


Hip-hop legends Jay-Z, Diddy and Nas endorsed banker Ray McGuire for New York City mayor. The three entertainers praised McGuire in a video posted on YouTube.


“People come from all over the world and say, ‘If I can make it here, I can make it anywhere.’ That’s the idea that we are trying to protect," Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter said. Sean “Diddy” Combs said that over the last 30 years, McGuire “was always talking about the people.”

Monday, June 7, 2021

Snoop Dogg To Join Def Jam label

 


Snoop Dogg is getting ready to bark out orders at Def Jam Recordings — he's joining the label as an executive creative and strategic consultant.

Sunday, September 27, 2020

Why New York Has Always Been Ground Breaking For Hip -hop Artist

 


Although 50, and Jay-Z may wear the crown as kings of New York, there surrounded by a number of thriving rappers like Nas who could make the claim and not be far off.


The Big Apple can also count on Biggie, Rakim, Public Enemy, The Beastie Boys, KRS-One, Mos Def, Slick Rick, Nikki Minaj, Run-D.M.C., Mase, and Wu Tang among its influential children, and that's just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to rappers from New York.


New York spawned some of the greatest rappers. The enduring spirit of New York hip-hop is unbridled confidence, limitless audacity. New York—and the Bronx specifically—is the birthplace of hip-hop.


The birthplace of hip-hop, mecca of the universe and even “the city that never sleeps” are some of the descriptive phrases that New York City is known for. On a hot summer night in the Bronx in 1973, DJ Kool Herc changed music forever. At his sister's back-to-school party on August 11—44 years ago today—he introduced what's since become recognized as hip-hop to an extremely enthusiastic audience.

Saturday, August 29, 2020

What If You Won The Chance To Meet And Greet With Nas?


Have you ever wondered what it would be like if you had the chance to meet and greet with Nas? What kind of question would you have for him? What type of reaction or vibe do you think you would have?

Fans Favorite and viewers of the Wrap-Up Magazine want to hear from you. What type of story and memory would you create about this topic?

Nas is an American rapper, songwriter, entrepreneur, and investor. The son of jazz musician Olu Dara, Nas has released twelve studio albums since 1994, with seven of them certified platinum and multi-platinum in the US.

Friday, September 28, 2018

EP: Ervin Mitchell - "Let There Be Light"



Atlanta representer, Ervin Mitchell, drops off his brand new 4-track project titled, Let there be light.



Below you can read about the process and inspiration behind the project, and also get a few more gems from Ervin as he opens up about his come up and future goals.

Twitter:

Check out this interview as Ervin Mitchell sits down with content creator, Ras Asan Olugbenga, as he talks personal life, career, and his newest project, Let There Be Light.

Monday, May 10, 2021

How Eminem Inherited Beef With Ja Rule

 


Unlike some of Eminem’s other feuds, he didn’t poke fun at or diss Ja Rule in a track first. The beef was initially between Ja and 50 Cent, however, the two rap giants can’t even agree on how it began.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Key Moments In Hip-Hop History

 


Hip hop is more than music; it’s a cultural movement that incorporates different elements of art. Before there was Lil Yachty, Young M.I.A., or YNW Melly, there was a world of hip hop artist who's name rain supreme even still today.


Back when music was real, artist had the opportunity to shine in their own distinctive way. Rap is one of the most distinctive features of hip-hop. Rappers use rhythm, lyrics, and vocal tone to express themselves. The best rappers are distinguished by their “flow” – the way the words run together without the performer getting tongue-tied.


Take this journey with me into the world of hip hop as we define all the odds to our culture. Note: When I mention hip hop, I don't mean rap music. They do not fit into the same category as each other.

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

Irv Gotti Talks Relationship With Jay-Z, And Nas

 


Irv Gotti spoke about when he tried to sign Nas to Murder Inc. but said he ultimately regretted the decision due to bad timing. While Nas flirted with signing to Murder Inc., 

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Top 5 Hottest Foxy Brown Photos

The Wrap-Up Magazine has released the top 5 hottest photos of +Foxy Brown from New York. Inga DeCarlo Fung Marchand, better known by her stage name Foxy Brown, is an American rapper, model, and actress. Foxy Brown speaks on relationship with Jay Z and Nas, says they were like a "husband and a side jump-off" to her.
 Nicki Minaj paused the NYFW madness to wish Foxy Brown a happy birthday. Foxy Brown, Lil' Kim, Da Brat, and Total got together for the recording of Bad Boy's remix of "No One Else". This was the only track that Lil' Kim and Foxy Brown appeared on together, the two were friends.
 Foxy Brown, a Brooklyn native, never thought she would be in the rap industry. Foxy Brown stops by RapFix Live to talk about a forced reunion with Lil' Kim. ANew York salon owner accused Foxy Brown of walking off with $900 of fake hair without paying her tab.
 Foxy Brown is an American rapper, model, and actress who has a net worth of $1.8 million dollars. Whether it was a confrontation with Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, DMX and Foxy Brown or his former label mates Snoop Dogg and Daz Dillinger.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Nas Featured In GQ Magazine

GQ: Last year was the twentieth anniversary of Illmatic. Do you recognize that person who made that record now?
Nas: Sure—he was a vivacious young man full of a lot of great ideas, excited and ready.

Would he recognize you?
That young man would’ve saw past who I am today. I’ve slowed myself down, probably. That young man was prepared to go further.

You’re saying your level of ambition is lower now?
I’m basically saying I can’t do twenty shows a month. Back then I probably could.

Illmatic was one of the first records to be hailed as a classic rap album. Did that ever feel like a burden, having to live up to it?
There was times before that people who were into the music had felt anxious for me to do something like it again. But I always felt blessed that I got music out there the way I wanted to get it out there, as soon as I shot the first shot.

But when you’re in the studio shooting the third shot, are you ever like, “Man, I wish that first shot hadn’t gone in so well”?
Then that’d mean I wish I didn’t exist. It’d be like saying I want to redo what I did before. And I don’t respect that. That’s not how I think.

You were also one of the first guys who had to deal with the fact that rappers all of a sudden could have this massive commercial success, right? You watched Biggie do it. The audience got bigger. Do you think your music changed once you realized there was an audience for it that was potentially massive?
Yeah, but it first changed because there was so many people that sounded similar. Once you do something new, then everything comes out sounding similar—the way a lot of things sound like Future today. So you have to come back and change it up. This music thing will challenge you, and it’s not nice to anybody. If there’s something good, it’s going to be imitated. And I had to overcome that. And then you had B.I.G., who was just killing the world and taking his core with him while he went mainstream with it—which was not happening at the time, because hip-hop music didn’t play on radio all day until he helped it. He took it to a higher level. Biggie just shook everybody off of him and said, “Can you do this?” And you couldn’t sit there and say, “Nah, I’m not going to do it.” When B.I.G. took it to a bigger level, if you couldn’t compete, you were out the game. And that’s what happened to at least twenty different guys who were out around that time.

Why weren’t you one of those twenty guys?
Because I’m in it to be what the essence of hip-hop is. If MCs are saying they’re this and they’re that, and they’re claiming that they’re this and that in the lyrics, and then you fall short, you’re out. It’s in the rhymes. It’s in the records. The records tell you what it is. You listen to everybody’s record during that time, they’re telling you, “We’re aiming for the top,” “I’m this,” “I’m the best,” “I’m that”—and I was in it just like them. Just like Biggie, just like the rest of them.

With Jay Z, you were a part of maybe the most visible rap feud short of Biggie and Tupac. Looking back on it now, what do you think the legacy of that was?
At the end of the day, the mission was to glue the game back: no more deaths. At this point, it’s about moving on and making something out of it. Because Biggie and Pac never lived to see that. They didn’t live to see themselves grow in this game. They did so much so young, which is great, but we’d love to have them here. All their fans and family miss them. They were the sacrifices, the martyrs for the entire hip-hop business.

Like when you go back and listen to “Ether” now, what do you hear?
I don’t. But I do listen to Biggie’s “Kick in the Door.” My friend last night told me, “He was coming for you, Nas. He was serious.” We go back to those times before we were established—when we were still one foot on the top and one foot on the street. Those were the times we talk about. Anything other than that, we’re chilling out.

So “Ether” is not a song you’ll revisit?
Word.

You’re 41 now. How have you changed as you’ve gotten older?
Now I think about Silicon Valley, I think about Napa Valley. I think about business and relaxing. Not too much—relax too much, you die.

Would you have posed with your ex-wife’s dress on the cover of a record, as you did with 2012′s Life Is Good, when you were 20?
I would’ve took it to another level. I’d have had an imitation of her—someone who looked like her in the dress. I would’ve went way further with it. That’s why the younger generation needs to never be afraid to go all the way. Because I wasn’t afraid. I expressed myself honestly. And it’s important for them to see that. After that thing happened, don’t be surprised if you see a 21-year-old artist do something similar, with a wedding ring or something. It’s going to happen.

Do you ever consider retirement?
From time to time I do consider it. It’s a busy life. So you want to sit back and think about doing different things and imagine what it’d be like. Deion Sanders was able to suit up for a baseball game and a football game in the same day. You think about him; you go, “Wow, what else should I do?”

What would you be doing if you weren’t rapping?
I’d be still creating. It could be screenplays, it could be bottled water, it could be a farm industry. It could be making up my own deodorant, it could be studying to be an engineer—highly unlikely, that one. But who knows?

I saw that you were protesting the Eric Garner verdict in New York City with Russell Simmons the other night. Do you have the activist calling at all?
But we’re already that. We’re already activists. I’m looking at what’s happening to the world, and I’m waiting for people to stop being scared. Mainly whites in power and in government, to not be scared of the race issue. Not be scared to say, “This is wrong, and this has to change.” Not be scared to do what’s right.

What do you think people are scared of?
Votes. Their career. Backlash. They’re confused; they don’t really know much about it. We’re all human beings. So I understand being scared. But at some point, you got to come out and do the right thing. No matter who you are, you got to put the people first. Compassion, and your love for people, has to exist. And your love to humanity has to exist. It can’t just always be about your career, your money, your stature, where you think you belong in this government. You’ve got to be about reality and love.

You’ve been in New York so long and seen Sean Bell, Amadou Diallo. Are you surprised that cops are still killing innocent people?
Unfortunately, I’m not surprised cops are still murdering people. But I am surprised that the law enforcement did not do the correct thing with illegal chokeholds. A chokehold because of a man stating his piece—telling them he didn’t do anything. An illegal chokehold! It’s embarrassing to New York, and it’s embarrassing to the country. I’ve got to go around the world, and people will ask me, “What’s wrong with America?” This is why they don’t like us. And this is why they’re going to beat us. When they see that weakness, they’re seeing a way to take us down. The outside world, they’ve already seen that. But even more now with the apartheidisms that’s going on today. We can sweep it under the rug, but when we sweep it under the rug, the rest of the world smells the debris.

What do you say when people ask what’s wrong with America?
I say America’s about fighters, and we fight each other sometimes, but that’s what family does. I try to make up shit, because it’s embarrassing, and they see through it. If the plane brings me to Paris and all over the news is the police shooting down dark people in the streets? I’d look at all of them as savages. And I’d say, “Wow, what’s wrong?” It’s transparent. They see what’s going on over here. And they laugh at our government and law enforcement. That’s one more for them. They’re really the civilized ones. And they see everyone as being more civilized than America. And we’ve got nothing to say.

What’s the role of an artist in this situation?
The situation has created the artist to begin with. It’s the backdrop to KRS-One’s greatest album, By All Means Necessary. It’s the backdrop to N.W.A.’s world-changing albums and The Chronic. The Chronic is all about the Rodney King verdict—besides him dissing the people he had to dis, it’s about the Rodney King verdict and the riots. It makes artists create and speak. The way James Baldwin did. The way Stevie Wonder did. The way Marvin Gaye said, “What’s going on?” We are the results of the bullshit. I’m here, partially, because of the bullshit that’s been going on. I’m a voice. I wouldn’t know that Compton existed in 1988, 1989, if it weren’t for those geniuses from that side called N.W.A. I wouldn’t have even known the place existed. I wouldn’t have known they suffered from the same stuff we suffered from in Queensbridge. We were beating our African drums to each other the same way we’ve always done since the beginning of time. It’s crazy. But that’s what we were doing. But rap music has never respected politics. We’ve never trusted anything. That’s the way the streets are. But it’s a whole new day. The guys who talked against the system—now the people want that person, that voice, to help change the system.

Do you feel responsible to that need?
If I’m in that position and the people call me, and they see me as someone who can help, then hell yeah.

Do you feel like other rappers have responded in a way you respect?
Everybody’s concerned—it’s not a rapper thing, it’s a people thing. It’s the NBA’s concern. They have kids. They could be in their car and be profiled. So of course we’re going to speak up. It’s a shame that people want us to stay in the corner and just get kicked in the ribs and just say, “Okay, kick me some more, kick me some more, I’m not going to say anything’s wrong with being kicked. I’m going to cover my mouth, I’m not even gonna scream. Just kick me until I’m dead. Because that’s what I deserve, right? Oh, how dare I say stop kicking me in the ribs in the corner? How dare I say that? Shame on me.” People are scared. It’s not an easy thing to deal with.

Part of what people want to believe about the stuff you were making in the early ’90s is that it would change things.
Yeah, on “Halftime,” I said: “Go to hell to the foul cop who shot Garcia.” There was a guy named Garcia in Washington Heights who was killed. Unarmed, whatever the situation was—maybe he was armed, I don’t remember at the moment the entire incident. I just knew the city was upset and I was upset. And I put it in my rhymes. On my first album, I’m talking about the same thing! And we’re still talking about it now.

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