Showing posts sorted by relevance for query prison. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query prison. Sort by date Show all posts

Monday, April 12, 2021

THE MIKE ENEMIGO STORY: HOW ONE PRISONER IS CHANGING THE GAME, ONE BOOK AT A TIME

THE MIKE ENEMIGO STORY: HOW ONE PRISONER IS CHANGING THE GAME, ONE BOOK AT A TIME

By Seth Ferranti
“If a person has done even a couple of years in prison and possess even the most basic means to obtain literature, there is a 99 percent chance that they’ve heard about Mike Enemigo and The Cell Block,” says Damaneh Abdolah, who plans to produce a podcast and documentary on Mike’s book Conspiracy Theory. But, make no mistake about it, things were not always this way. “Getting to this point has been a very long and arduous process,” says Mike about his journey to becoming America’s #1 incarcerated author. “Everything I’ve done, I’ve done from inside my prison cell. No Internet, computer, phone, text, e-mail or other fancy, helpful devices. Just a few pennies for a budget, and a bunch of ink pens, paper, stamps, envelopes, coffee, adversity, failures, determination, dedication, resilience, creativity and hard work. Oh, and a lot of time. In fact, several years.”

   

 See, Mike’s plan was never to write books, it was to rap. He started rapping back in 1993. Unfortunately, he got caught up in the streets, was arrested in February of 1999, and in 2002 was sentenced to Life Without the Possibility of Parole – LWOP, as it’s called – for a 1998 murder. Despite this, in 2004, after he’d been incarcerated for about 5 years, he decided he was going to do what he had to do to record his vocals, even if he had to do it over the prison phone, have his songs produced in the style of mixtapes, and distribute them independently –”maybe have my folks slang ‘em out the trunk, put ‘em in some local stores, etc. – nothin’ too fancy.” And though he hoped to make a few bucks, he didn’t expect to get rich and famous and become a huge rap star: “My primary objectives were to break my story out of prison, give my brain something to focus on other than my confinement, and at least make the money back I’d spent producing the records,” he says. He contacted some people he knew from the streets who were in the rap game and got the ball rolling. But though progress was made, things moved extremely slow. “Being that my resources were very limited, it took a long time to get the simplest of things done.” And by the time he’d accomplish one thing, the music game would change and make what he’d just gotten done less significant. In addition to that, as the years went on, people bought music less and less, due to things like file sharing and illegal downloading, and artists had to start depending more and more on things like live performances to make money; something he obviously couldn’t do from his prison cell. With that, the hope of making any profit got smaller and smaller. However, “I didn’t want to give up because I figured I could create my own little lane, and I’d use my music to promote it, feel me? I’d give my music away by way of downloads to promote myself, then I’d make my money off of something else that couldn’t be illegally downloaded or need to be performed live: maybe I’d learn to draw really well, become a ‘famous’ prison artist and sell my artwork, start a T-shirt line, or maybe even ghostwrite rhymes – something like that.”

   

 He continued on, but so did the problems. In addition to the rapid game changes, coming up on a recorder (something prisoners are not allowed), then recording his vocals and smuggling them out, was a near-impossible task (though he did manage to record and get the vocals to over 100 songs to the streets). And if that wasn’t enough, he began having problems with unreliable industry people and producers who didn’t put his music together the way he wanted, being that he wasn’t able to be present during his studio sessions. In the end, “It got to be too costly for me to do it myself, with my resources, or lack thereof, and I had to pull the plug because it was just to economically foolish to continue,” he explains. So, though it was tough, Mike shut everything down; even to the point of distancing himself from most of the world. “I had to strategize and figure out what my next move was going to be.” He began to research. He began to study. He began to learn, and he began to plot...

Welcome to...The Cell Block

In 2010, while in the hole, Mike decided it was time to redirect his efforts from that of the rap game to the book game. He’d been flirting with the idea for nearly two years already, so when he was given his property in the hole, he made sure to grab the English Grammar for Dummies book he’d bought for this very reason – so he could tighten up his grammar game. “I was always creative ‘cause I’d been writin’ raps. But writin’ raps and writin’ books is a whole different game. I knew if I was gonna do this, I needed to learn to write properly, and I had to master it,” he says. “So I began studying English Grammar for Dummies, while also working on my first book, which was Surviving Prison.” (This book wouldn’t be published until 2018.) Eventually Mike got out of the hole, where he was able to buy a typewriter and other supplies, and he began typing the books he’d written by hand, as well as figuring out how he was going to publish them, under the new publishing company he was building, The Cell Block, which he planned to run just like a record label. “When first trying to figure out how I was going to publish my books, I had no idea what I was gonna do,” he says. “My people were taking the Directory [The BEST Resource Directory for Prisoners] to Kinkos, trying to have it printed up. I think it cost us around $17 to have one copy printed and bound with one of those plastic strips. And with the leading directory at the time priced at $18, there was no way we were going to be able to sell ours at a profit,” he explains. “But one thing I knew for sure, I wasn’t gonna quit or give up. So I kept reading everything I could find, and eventually I saw something about CreateSpace. This was a game-changer for me.”

   

Mike launched The Cell Block officially in 2014 with five books – The BEST Resource Directory For Prisoners, The Art & Power of Letter Writing for Prisoners, Thee Enemy of the State and Conspiracy Theory, all of which he wrote; and Loyalty & Betrayal, a book he did with Armando Ibarra – with a promise of many more to come. And, though things did not go exactly as he hoped (what else is new, right?) in 2014, he learned a lot and built upon his team. In January 2015 he dropped four more books – BASic Fundamentals of The Game, by Mac B.A.$.; Lost Angels, a book he did with Alex Valentine; and Money iz the Motive, a book he did with TCB author Ca$ciou$ Green, plus the revision of his Directory. He continued on, and in 2016 dropped seven  books: How to Hustle & Win; Sex, Money, Murder Edition, and Underworld Zilla, with TCB author King Guru; Money iz the Motive 2, MOBSTAR Money and Block Money, with TCB author Ca$ciou$ Green; The Millionaire Prisoner: Special TCB Edition, with incarcerated author Josh Kruger; and A Guide to Relapse Prevention For Prisoners, with inmate Charles Hottinger. In 2017 he dropped the newest edition of The Best Resource Directory for Prisoners, and Kitty Kat, a non-nude adult entertainment resource book he did with Freebird Publishers. In 2018 he dropped several more books: Surviving Prison: The Secrets to Surviving the Most Treacherous and Notorious Prisons in America!; The Art & Power of Letter Writing for Prisoners, Deluxe Edition;  and the revised edition of The Best Resource Directory for Prisoners. He dropped Pretty Girls Love Bad Boys: An Inmate’s Guide to Getting Girls and How to Write Urban Books for Money & Fame with TCB author King Guru. He dropped Get Out, Get Rich: How To Get Paid Legally When You Get Out of Prison! (also titled Hood Millionaire: How to Hustle & Win Legally); The CEO Manual: How to Start Your Own Business When You Get Out of Prison! (also titled CEO Manual: Start a Business, Be a Boss!); and Money Manual: Underground Cash Secrets Exposed, all with self-made hood millionaire Sav Hu$tle; and he dropped Prison Legal Guide with Freebird Publisher. He also completely revamped his website, thecellblock.net.

 

In 2019, the hustle didn’t stop, or even slow down. He tapped in with Wahida Clark, the Official Queen of Street Lit and worked a distribution deal for TCB books Underworld Zilla; How to Hustle & Win: Sex, Money, Murder Edition; and Money iz the Motive: Special 2-in-1 Edition. Then he dropped The Prison Manual: The Complete Guide to Surviving the American Prison System and The Ladies Who Love Prisoners, both of which he wrote; Loyalty & Betrayal: Special Deluxe Edition; OJ’s Life Behind Bars: The Real Story, a book he did with incarcerated author Vernon Nelson;  Get Out, Stay Out: The Secrets To Getting Out of Prison Early, and Staying Out For Good! with Shane Bowen; and Raw Law For Prisoners: Your Rights And How To SUE When They Are Violated! with TCB author King Guru. He also dropped two e-shorts:  The Mob, with author PaperBoy; and Angel with incarcerated author Tre Cunningham. As you can see, the hard work, determination, and perseverance has paid off. When asked about his drive: “I’ve always been a hustler. Above all else, that’s what I am – a hustler. My desire’s always been to get the bag [money]. Before, I put a lot of effort and drive into negative things – thuggin’, basically. So, the things I was doin’ to get the bag was, essentially, just getting me further into debt, you feel me? I knew I had to transform my hustle if I wanted to truly be successful, and this writing thing is a major part of that. I also knew that if I put the same drive and energy into this as I did the gimy shit I was doin’, I’d win. “So, I went from dope dealer to hope dealer. I dreamed of slangin’ birds, but now I’m achieving my dreams slangin’ words, you feel me? I’m shippin’ boxes of books like I wanted to ship bricks. And not only am I completely legit, I’m making more money now than I ever did with my grimy endeavors. “I found my lane – my frequency. I want to be the best, and I’m willing to do whatever it takes to ensure that happens.” Not only has Mike been making noise inside prison, the streets are taking notice, too. He’s received praise from bestselling authors like JaQuavis Coleman and Kevin Deutsch, and he and/or The Cell Block have been featured in magazines like Straight Stuntin, Kite, State V. Us, Street Money, Prison Legal News, and others, and on websites like The Huffington Post, Gorilla Convict, Thizzler, Rap Bay, Hood Illustrated, and many more. “I promise you I’m just gettin’ started,” he says.

   

 What’s next? Well, more books, of course. “For years prisoners have written me, asking how to go about doing what I do in regards to publishing books, so I wrote a book on jailhouse publishing that I’ma drop sometime this year [2020]. The book contains everything I’ve learned over the last ten years the hard and expensive way. I have several more books in the works, including audio books, something I plan to take to the next level. I also have some things in the works with the big homie, Dutch, the OG of the street lit game. I have a bunch of projects going on right now that I’m excited about.” But something he’s especially proud of? “I launched a new blog on my website where me and other TCB writers provide raw, uncensored news, entertainment and resources on the topics of prison and street-culture. It’s connected to all social medias, as well as book platforms like Amazon, Goodreads, etc. It’s a game-changer. I’m building The Cell Block’s own digital platform so we’re not at the mercy of anyone else. This is going to increase our power and presence dramatically. Everyone needs to tap in to our website, thecellblock.net, and follow us on all social medias.” And when asked about the possibility of getting out of prison? “Laws are changing in my favor. In addition to that, I’m not sittin’ around waitin’ on somebody to just let me out. I’m taking aggressive, proactive measures to earn my freedom. I have a 5-year plan and a 10-year plan. I’d say I’ll be out in about eight. It took me a minute to understand how all this works, but if one wants to get out bad enough, and is willing to do what it takes, it can be done. At least in California. And though I’m not certain, probably most everywhere else, too. The secret is to identify what it is you need to do, then do double that.” And Mike’s been inspiring prisoners all over the country, as evident by the mass amounts of letters he gets, thanking him for what he’s done. “I’m in prison in Tennessee. I’m a huge fan and receive knowledge and wisdom from your teachings,” writes one prisoner. “Thank you for all you do to make life easier for us prisoners,” writes another, from California. “I have bought every book that you’ve published and I encourage you to keep serving it like you’re doing,” says prisoner Ethan McKinney. And Jorge Cabrera from Oregon says, “I have to say, I’ve been incarcerated for 20-plus years, and this is the first time I’ve invested money into something that’s profitable.” Literally, the list goes on and on. “I’m proud of all that’s been accomplished,” says Mike. “Not only have the years of hard work paid off for me and the TCB team, I’m proving that, despite our situation, we can still achieve success if we’re willing to do what it takes.

   

 “I’m very grateful to the prisoners who’ve been rockin’ with us. It’s because of them – their loyalty – that we’ve been able to get to where we’re at. You can be the dopest writer in the world, but if the people don’t fuck with you, you ain’t ever gonna get anywhere. Fortunately, for me, the people fuck with me. They understand I’m talkin’ their language, and for that, they embrace me.” And when asked what kind of advice he’d share to other prisoners? “Stay positive and motivated. When you live inside a box, you must learn to think outside of one. Be creative. Confinement can cause a man to tap into the deepest parts of the mind. Take advantage of that, be dedicated and determined, and you’ll be surprised at what you can pull off. This is proof. My story is a testament that you must never give up. You’re first idea is rarely your best one, and the road to success is not a straight shot. “Now get to work and hustle hard.” Indeed.  

To learn more about Mike Enemigo and The Cell Block, visit thecellblock.net, where you can also subscribe to the Official Blog of The Cell Block. And be sure to follow Mike on IG @mikeenemigo and FB/thecellblockofficial.

“This author has a unique voice and his versatile pen is refreshing. Mike has my stamp of approval.” – JaQuavis Coleman, New York Times Best Selling Author

“My man Mike represents the west coast like a literary OG! I respect his grind and pen game! Look out for The Cell Block!” – Dutch

“Mike Enemigo’s work is raw, authentic, and powerful. It’s made all the more remarkable by the fact that Mike’s books are written from inside a California prison. His work gives hope to incarcerated writers everywhere struggling to get their voices heard.” – Kevin Deutsch, Award-winning True Crime Writer, Author of Pill City: How Two Honor Roll Students Foiled the Feds and Built a Drug Empire

Saturday, January 5, 2019

Should Bill Cosby Have Went To Prison


Through all the fame and people in everyone's home on television, one of the most loved men in the world was sent to prison. Do you think his prison sentence was justice? How do you feel things should have gone?

William Henry Cosby Jr. is an American stand-up comedian, actor, musician, author, and now a convicted sex offender. That is a hard title to add to your belt if you were in his shoes.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Top 5 Remy Ma Hot Photos

The Wrap-Up Magazine has released the top 5 hottest photos of female rapper Remy Ma. Remy Ma, formerly Rémy Martin, is a Grammy-nominated American rapper and former member of Big Pun's rap crew, Terror Squad.
 Remy Ma, Niki Minaj and Rah Digga are probably three of the hardest female Mc's of all time. Remy Ma has been released from prison, a representative from her camp has confirmed it July 28th.
 Remy Ma sits down with VIBE to talk about her kids, her marriage to fellow New York rapper Papoose. Papoose became known to the public when he appeared in 1998 on Kool G Rap's album. Remy Ma freestyles over over Bobby Shmurda's 'Hot Nigga.'In case you missed it (you probably didn't), Remy Ma is back.
 You would figure Remy Ma's last days in prison would be better because she was closer to getting out, but to the contrary – they were her worst she stated. Papoose is floating on Cloud 9 since Remy Ma was released from prison.

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Lil Boosie Released From Prison

Rapper +LIL BOOSIE a famous rapper hailing from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is reportedly now a free man from prison. He was released on March 5th. It was soon confirmed by the Angola State Penitentiary.

The rapper was surpose to be released in February 2013. 31-year-old Lil' Boosie (Terrence Hatch) was originally sent to prison due to a marijuana charge that came in 2009. In 2011, Boosie was sentenced to eight years in prison after pleading guilty to his drug charges. A jury later found Boosie not guilty of alleged 1st-degree murder. While in prison, he got busted for attempting to smuggle drugs (codeine syrup). It looked like Boosie's prison sentence was going to be increased by seven more years, but that didn't come to pass.

In December 2013, it was revealed that he was supposed to be released on August 18, 2014. However, Boosie's brother/manager announced that the release date had been pushed up to February 2014. Later on (January 29, 2014, it was later reported that Boosie would be freed on February 13, 2014, then it changed to the following week. Now it's definite - Lil' Boosie has been freed on March 5, 2014. Boosie will remain on parole until 2018.

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Prison Inmates Protest Modern Day Slavery

On September 9, 1971, nearly half of the 2,200 prisoners in New York's Attica Correctional Facility staged a revolt to demand better living conditions. Exactly 45 years to the date, inmates from 40 prisons across 24 states, were unified in taking a stand of their own, which is comprised of many of the principles the prisoner's of Attica '71 stood for. Organizers who dubbed the event a call to end "modern-day slavery," are hoping that the strike their action boils down to, will speak loudly enough to force a change of living conditions, forced labor, and some fundamental pillars of the criminal justice system which they say sustains the oppression of the prison population.

Back in May, an Alabama prison strike followed one that took place in Texas the month prior, thus, the act is not necessarily anything new per-se. But it is one of the first times in modern history that inmates across state borders have attempted to coordinate a nationwide demonstration. Plans for the national protest were born out of The Free Alabama Movement, whose members began circulating fliers inviting prisoners to come up with demands they would recommend for improving conditions.

Some of the typical jobs inmates hold include landscaping, kitchen work, and general cleaning. While wages in some prisons very from state to state, inmates in federal penitentiaries earn between 12 and 40 cents an hour. In Texas, Arkansas, and Georgia, prisoners do not get compensated at all for their labor. Even more disconcerting to activists is the fact that prisoners really have no choice but to accept the work they are given, or face repercussions. "Typically prisoners are required to work, and if they refuse to work, they can be punished by having their sentences lengthened and being placed in solitary confinement," Wright said Editor of Prison Legal News.

"We're realistic. We know that all our demands aren't going to be given to us," says organizer Phillip Ruiz of the Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee. "The hope is that some concrete things develop as far as changing the conditions." He hopes the protest will send the message to prison authorities that "You guys aren't going to get away with what you're doing to prisoners anymore."

Monday, July 7, 2014

The New Hotel Het Arresthuis

Can you imagine experiencing modern comfort within a former prison building? If so, then you should check out the +Hotel Het Arresthuis. Captured between the world that meant lack of freedom – still visible in the cast iron stairs and landings, prison bars and cell doors – and the luxury of traveling the globe, this hotel creates a curious feeling diluted by the visual and physical comfort of modern design elements.
The prison building built back in 1850 went through renovations and extensions before it was re-designed by studio Engelman Architecten. Each room is made of three interconnected prison cells designed as the living room, bedroom and bathroom. Retaining most of its original design, this reshaped building showcases a revived street facade flanked by two new apartment blocks and a new gate.
Within the prison complex, the courtyard was reshaped to offer a semi-open space where history and future come together in a successful effort to provide us with a new perception of the spaces we use. The really redifines the prison system.

Wednesday, October 6, 2021

Cold Ca$e could be spending his life in prison. He and his family are making music instead 

Cold Ca$e could be spending his life in prison. He and his family are making music instead 

As Thomas Sipes describes it, he’s lived a “hellacious” life. It was only a few years ago that Sipes, better known as East Coast rapper Cold Ca$e, found himself staring down 99 years in prison. He faced a third felony charge in California, a state where a “third strike” can mean life behind bars.“During that whole time it was like a transition time for me,” says Sipes. “I was trying to mature as a person and a father and I was trying to get out of the whole hustle game, get out of selling drugs and get away from street life. 

Thursday, March 31, 2016

C-Murder New Music Video

(The Wrap-Up Magazine) C-Murder, also known as Corey Miller, released a video “Dear Supreme Court/Under Pressure” last week. The Louisiana rapper serving life in prison for killing a 16-year-old boy is appealing to the state’s Supreme Court for help — through his music.

The 45-year-old rapper proclaimed his innocence in the video and asked the state’s high court to release him, even though he has been convicted twice for the slaying. Prison officials are looking into whether the rapper recorded music while in the Angola prison. C-Murder told prison officials that any material released by his record company was recorded before he was jailed, but he refused to take a polygraph test.

The rapper recorded all of the vocals on the album while under house arrest several years ago, according to his manager, Manuel Ortiz. “He had a studio at his home,” he said. “He has recorded an ungodly amount of unreleased music.”

C-Murder was first found guilty in 2003 for shooting teen Steve Thomas during a brawl at a nightclub just outside of New Orleans. A state district judge later ruled prosecutors withheld information about the criminal background of a witness, and ordered a new trial. C-Murder was convicted again for the same crime in 2009.

Miller proclaims his innocence and asks the state’s high court to release him, charging that his two trials were rigged. He claims in the video that he ended up in prison because “a judge wanted a better job than what he had, because detectives wanted a raise and a slap on the back.”

Saturday, October 6, 2018

The First Killing In California Prison In 20 Years


An inmate facing a death sentence for killing a 14-year-old girl was stabbed to death while in the recreation yard of the San Quentin State Prison.

Jonathan Fajardo, 30, who was on death row for first-degree-murder in connection with the racially charged shooting death of Cheryl Green in Los Angeles, was stabbed in his chest and neck in the East Block Housing Unit recreation yard of the prison just before 10 a.m., according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

Luis Rodriguez, 34, was identified by prison officials as the suspect in Fajardo’s fatal stabbing. Officials said Rodriguez, who was also on death row, made the weapon used in the attack. Officials did not immediately release a potential motive in the stabbing.

Prison officials said Rodriguez had been facing a death sentence on two counts of first-degree murder with special circumstances at the time of the Friday’s attack. He started his sentence on September 30, 2015.

Monday, December 10, 2018

51-Year Sentence To Lady Who Was Sold As A Sex Slave


I don't believe this ruling was fair by any means. Some type of appeal should be taking place for this young lady who deserves lesser time for her crime.

Cyntoia Brown was 16 and a victim of sex trafficking when she was arrested for killing the man who allegedly solicited her for sex, Johnny Allen. In her defense, she says she believed he was reaching for his gun to kill her. However, Tennessee’s Supreme Court clarified an earlier ruling that she must remain in prison for 51 years before she is eligible for release.

Source

The state Supreme Court’s response comes after a lawsuit was filed claiming Brown’s life sentence is unconstitutional based on a previous Supreme Court ruling that said sentencing a minor to a mandatory life sentence was against the Constitution. Only 20 states and the District of Columbia have banned life without parole for minors. Tennessee is not one of those states; there, people convicted of first-degree murder can only be released from prison after serving at least 51 years of their 60-year sentence. A U.S. District Court in Tennessee noted that her sentence was different because she received a “life sentence, not a sentence of life without the possibility of parole.”

The Women’s March, Kim Kardashian West, Rihanna, and LeBron James have all publicly supported Brown’s release, funded legal support, and used her case to shed light on a larger need for prison reform and the systematic racism ingrained in our justice system. “The system has failed. It’s heartbreaking to see a young girl sex trafficked then when she has the courage to fight back is jailed for life! We have to do better & do what’s right. I’ve called my attorneys yesterday to see what can be done to fix this,” Kardashian tweeted.

In 2004, Brown was forced into prostitution by a pimp known as “Cut Throat” who she believed was her boyfriend. According to court documents, Allen allegedly brought Brown to his home and paid her to have sex with him. She was under the state’s age of consent at the time. In her testimony, Brown said that Allen showed her multiple guns in his home. When she believed that he was reaching under his bed to grab a gun and shoot her, she grabbed a gun out of her purse and shot him. She was tried as an adult and convicted of first-degree premeditated murder, first-degree felony murder, and especially aggravated robbery. Brown has already served 14 years in prison.

In response to the court’s decision, the Women’s March tweeted in support of Brown and other sex trafficking victims, adding that the next Women’s March on January 19, 2019 is for them as well. The organization asked their supporters to contact Tennessee’s governor, Bill Haslam, to demand Brown’s release. “Gov. Haslam has the power to #FreeCyntoia. Every day she remains in prison, he is actively choosing not to,” they tweeted.

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Inmate Sentences May Be Getting Reduced


This is good news for those of you who have family members locked up in prison. The Senate on Tuesday overwhelmingly passed a sweeping overhaul of the criminal justice system, after a remarkable political shift from Republicans who voted in large numbers to save money by reducing prison sentences, handing a rare bipartisan victory to President Trump.

The First Step Act passed on a vote of 87 to 12, with dozens of Republicans, including longtime holdout Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), joining all 49 members of the Democratic caucus to approve legislation that even some GOP supporters fear could leave them vulnerable to charges of being soft on crime.

Source

“This will keep our communities safer, and provide hope and a second chance, to those who earn it,” he wrote on Twitter. “In addition to everything else, billions of dollars will be saved. I look forward to signing this into law!”

The product of years of negotiations, the legislation represents a major pivot for the GOP, which decades ago embraced a law-and-order rallying cry and war on drugs campaign as crucial to winning votes. But as crime rates have dropped and states have pursued cost-effective ways to cut the prison population, Congress has favored changes to the system, with GOP lawmakers arguing for rehabilitating some offenders rather than longtime incarceration.

The bill would revise several sentencing laws, such as reducing the “three strikes” penalty for drug felonies from life behind bars to 25 years and retroactively limiting the disparity in sentencing guidelines between crack and powder cocaine offenses. The latter would affect about 2,000 current federal inmates.

It also overhauls the federal prison system to help inmates earn reduced sentences and lower recidivism rates. A different version passed the House this year, so the House would have to pass the latest draft before it can be sent to Trump for his signature. The House is expected to endorse that bill when it comes up for a likely vote later this week, and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) has expressed support for the legislation.

The bill, which does not cover state jails and prisons, would through reductions in sentencing do the equivalent of shaving a collective 53,000 years off the sentences of federal inmates over the next 10 years , according to the Congressional Budget Office — though some advocacy groups dispute this figure. There were about 181,000 federal inmates as of Dec. 13, according to the Bureau of Prisons.

The bill received a major boost last month when Trump endorsed it as “reasonable sentencing reforms while keeping dangerous and violent criminals off our streets.” His thinking was heavily influenced by his son-in-law and White House adviser Jared Kushner, who has long advocated sentencing restructuring and marshaled endorsements of the bill from a diverse coalition including law enforcement, and the American Civil Liberties Union.

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Thursday, May 20, 2021

Welcome to Prison Riot Radio

Kwame Teague aka Dutch has been incarcerated for almost 30 years and while ensuring he remained positive and productive despite his circumstances he turned to writing and has over the years become one of America’s favorite authors. Along the way Dutch has aggressively searched for various outlets and platforms that not only allow but eagerly look for those incarcerated individuals whose voice has been stifled and allow them time and space to have their voices heard. Unfortunately, Dutch didn’t find many platforms doing such so he decided to make it his mission to find the right team to create it themselves.

   

 That being said; allow me to introduce you to, Prison Riot Radio. the hottest and largest online platform powered by, ran by and focusing on incarcerated individuals past and present. www.prisonriotradio.com Alongside Professor CQuence and Dutch’s wife Jay Rene they launched Prison Riot Radio. A platform all about empowering incarcerated artist and giving a voice to the revolutionaries and those making a change. 

Friday, February 25, 2022

Jay-Z And Yo Gotti Team Up With A&E

 


A&E Networks announced that they had greenlit an upcoming four-part docu-series titled Exposing Parchman. The series will follow JAY-Z and Yo Gotti and Roc Nation’s philanthropic branch Team Roc after they spearheaded a civil rights lawsuit alongside the 29 inmates of Mississippi’s notorious Parchman Prison. 

Friday, April 16, 2021

1090 Jake's YouTube Channel "End Of Sentence" Continues To Grow

1090 Jake has found a way to turn his tragedy into triumph through tell his real-life story of being incarcerated at the age of 18 with 19 Felony Charges. Blowing up through his End Of Sentence YouTube Channel, 1090 Jake has amassed over 300k Subscribers and over 50 Million views worldwide in less than two years. Known as a "six-figure felon," 1090 Jake has found a way to become his own boss bringing in over 6 figures annually. 

Born in Malden, Massachusetts then raised in Tampa, Florida - 1090Jake was arrested in the Sulpher Springs neighborhood of North Tampa for carrying a concealed firearm. With the DA added additional charges, 1090 Jake with hit with a total of 19 Felonies, one of which was punishable by life in the State of Florida. Eventually, he would be convicted of 4 Felonies after a plea deal and sentenced to 36 months in Florida State Prison. 

On his channel End Of Sentence, 1090Jake relives his prison experience describing the gang wars, gladiator-like violence, and abuse by staff. Jake's unfiltered approach to storytelling has captivated thousands and the viciousness behind his stories kept many hooked to his Youtube channel. 1090 Jake proudly displays a mugshot of himself at 19 years old with a fresh 7-inch slash down his face from when he was attacked with a razor.  Being the only photo that exists of him at the age of 19 this image alone captures the reality of prison of what 1090 Jake went through to survive. Serving time in the Youth Offender prisons aged 14-24 he’d been slashed, stabbed, and had his head split with a brick in a canteen bag all within his first year, but the violence was never one-sided. In 1090 Jake's first interview he describes slashing the throat of a rival gang member in the same cell as his in confinement. Eventually being transferred to an adult prison after a massive gang transfer, 1090 Jake was able to earn his high school diploma only 2 weeks before his release. 

Moving back to Massachusetts, he had no choice but to start from the ground up - rebuilding his life in Boston. Struggling to find work, Jake was arrested again in July of 2016, exactly 1 year after his release for Armed Assault with intent to rob, and Assault with a firearm. 1090 Jake would find himself on probation for the next 2 1/2 years, and in May of 2019 he took a leap of faith and started his YouTube Channel without any idea of exactly how many people would relate to his life story. 1090 Jake has used his platform to not only share his story but also the story of others he’s met inside of prison, both dead and alive - giving a voice to those who can’t be heard. Applying a convict's way of researching court paperwork, he has adapted to a style of narrating while covering criminal cases in the Hip Hop community and major crime cases around the country, not only diversifying his content but showing his progression as a content creator. With the craziness of 2021, it doesn’t seem 1090 Jake will be lacking in content anytime soon, and we look forward to what’s to come.

Be sure to subscribe to 1090 Jake on YouTube and follow him on Instagram for new content and videos updated daily. 

Sunday, July 12, 2020

Jay-Z, Yo Gotti, And Team ROC File Lawsuit Over Conditions In Parchman Penitentiary


Jay-Z, Yo Gotti, and Team ROC have helmed legal action on behalf of 227 Mississippi inmates at Parchman Prison, Pitchfork can confirm via legal documents. The class action lawsuit has been brought against the new Mississippi Department of Corrections Commissioner Nathan Burl Cain and prison healthcare provider Centurion. The complaint urges Cain and Centurion to address allegedly subpar living conditions at Parchman.

In addition to the lawsuit, Yo Gotti and Team ROC’s attorneys had several Parchman inmates submit sworn COVID-19 questionnaire forms detailing the lack of COVID-19 testing protocol at the prison. The returned questionnaires describe a lack of social distancing, PPE, and more at the penitentiary.

Thursday, September 6, 2018

Offset Talks Kim Kardashian Being President


Kim Kardashian's flirtation with political activism has Offset's support. In an interview today (Sept. 6) with TMZ, the Migos member praised the reality television star's advocacy for criminal justice reform.

"Hell yeah, I fuck with that shit. I've been through that shit," Offset said in response to a question about Kardashian's work. "To be able to have a second chance? That's one hunnid."

The rapper, currently touring on Drake's Aubrey and the Three Migos Tour, faces charges in Georgia for an improper lane change, possession of marijuana, possession of a weapon by a convicted felon and possession of a weapon after being pulled over in a traffic stop that his attorney has called "racially motivated."

TMZ's inquiry seems to be inspired by Kardashian's recent meetings with Donald Trump, whom she's now lobbied to free two people in prison, including Alice Marie Johnson, whose sentence for cocaine distribution and money laundering was commuted by the president in June after the 63-year-old woman spent 23 years in federal prison.

Kardashian reportedly returned to the White House yesterday (Sept. 5) to seek a pardon for Chris Young, whose 2010 arrest for marijuana and cocaine possession led to a life sentence in maximum-security prison. Young is one of around 3,800 individuals currently serving life sentences in the United States for drug offenses, according to the Buried Alive Project.

"He’s had to have a few surgeries and he’s been in a medical facility for a few years, and he goes back into the maximum-security prison where lifers have to go. And he’s had a perfect record," Kardashian told Jason Flom’s Wrongful Conviction podcast.


Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Inmate Starves To Death


A prison doctor has been fired and two other staffers are in the midst of being dismissed after an inmate at the Kentucky State Penitentiary starved himself to death, a case that has exposed lapses in medical treatment and in how hunger strikes are handled at the facility. Prison officials have asked prosecutors to investigate after The Associated Press began asking questions about the inmate’s death.


James Kenneth Embry, 57 and with just three years left on a nine-year sentence for drug offenses, began to spiral out of control in the spring of 2013 after he stopped taking anti-anxiety medication. Seven months later, in December, after weeks of erratic behavior — from telling prison staff he felt anxious and paranoid to banging his head on his cell door — Embry eventually refused most of his meals. By the time of his death in January of this year, he had shed more than 30 pounds on his 6-foot frame and died weighing just 138 pounds, according to documents reviewed by the AP.


An internal investigation determined that medical personnel failed to provide him anti-anxiety medication that may have kept his suicidal thoughts at bay and didn’t take steps to check on him as his condition worsened. The internal review of Embry’s death also exposed broader problems involving the treatment of inmates — including a failure to regularly check inmates on medical rounds and communication lapses among medical staff.

The AP, tipped off to Embry’s death, obtained scores of documents under Kentucky‘s Open Records Act, including a report detailing the investigation into Embry’s death, an autopsy report and personnel files. Along with interviews with corrections officials and correspondence with inmates, the documents describe Embry’s increasingly paranoid behavior until his death and the numerous opportunities for various prison staff to have intervened.

Friday, October 26, 2018

Suge Knight Transferred To Prison


Suge arrived Tuesday at Wasco State Prison and from the looks of his miserable mug shot above, it doesn’t seem like the former music mogul is excited about his new spot.

He’ll have to go through physical and mental examinations and review his records before getting settled at Wasco. Depending on the results he can stay there, or be transferred to another prison.

The jail is in the middle of nowhere in Kern County, and has 400 beds. It’s definitely a stretch in comparison to what the former Death Row Records CEO was used to during his prime, celebrating in Hollywood with the likes of Tupac, Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg.

Suge Knight took a plea deal last month and was sentenced to 28 years in jail. He got credit for time served, but fortunately for him, due to prison overcrowding, he may be out in about 10 years.

Friday, October 5, 2018

Suge Knight Sentenced to 28 Years in Prison

Suge Knight
Suge Knight was sentenced to 28 years in prison on Thursday (October 4) afternoon for the murder of Terry Carter.

Suge struck a plea deal for the sentence on September 20, days before standing trial for murder and attempted murder.

Suge Knight has accepted a plea deal for 28-years after pleading no contest to voluntary manslaughter in the murder of Terry Carter, according to TMZ. The Death Row founder will be credited time served for the 3 1/2 years he spent in jail leading up to his sentencing. Suge will also be on parole for three years following his prison sentence.

Suge Knight Collapses In Court Video

Suge's prior felony convictions also made this sentencing much harsher. He received five extra years because the murder was considered "serious and violent" as well as another year tacted on for using the truck as a deadly weapon.

According to TMZ, Suge Knight has struck a plea deal in the murder case of Terry Carter this afternoon (September 20). Suge was facing life in prison for killing Carter in 2015 in the parking lot of Tam's Burgers in Compton. He also ran over Cle "Bone" Sloan," who was injured but survived.

Suge has maintained that he wasn't trying to hurt Sloan or Carter and says he was trying to escape after believing that they were both about to shoot him. Suge has been behind bars awaiting trial since the 2015 incident.

Friday, July 4, 2014

Mendeecees Brother Sentenced

Love & Hip Hop star Yandy Smith’s life was turned upside down when her fianceé, Mendeecees Harris, turned himself in on drug trafficking charges in 2013. More than a year later, Yandy was able to get her boo out of prison on $600,000 bail, but it looks like things weren’t so great for Mendeecees’s brother, Tyrus Harris, who was also involved. According to local Rochester, New York, newspaper Democrat & Chronicle, Tyrus was hit with a hefty sentence, prompting us to wonder if Mendeecees is next!

On June 30 2014, Tyrus was sentenced to five years in prison for his “minor” involvement in a drug trafficking network that transported $2.5 million dollars in drugs between 2005 and 2012 from New York City to the Rochester region. Back in December 2013, the third member of the conspiracy, Ronald Walker, pled guilty to narcotics conspiracy and money laundering and implicated Mendeecees as one of the lead men in the crime. Ronald was given a sentence of 10 years in prison with five years of supervised probation.

We do know that the narcotics charges in this case could hold a serious charge of up to 20 years in prison, in addition to several fines — a little fact that Yandy was exceptionally anxious about during Season 4 of Love & Hip Hop. Mendeecees, who has had his assets seized in connection with the investigation, is scheduled to return to a federal court in October with a not guilty plea.

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