Tuesday, August 16, 2022

How To Use Digital Mixers

 


The digital mixer is an electronic device used in sound processing, specifically for combining sounds from different audio sources using digital circuitry. The digital mixer—otherwise known as mixing desk, mixing console or mixing board—is widely used to engineer sound quality in both recordings as well as in live broadcast like in public address (PA) system. It is also used to change the sound dynamics and many other properties of the audio signals using one or more of its multiple input channels. 


Moreover, with the use of the digital mixer, you can easily tweak or add effects to audio signals; afterward, you can combine these signals to mono or stereo output for amplification on a PA system. This process is called a “house mix.” 


When engineering a “house mix” for a particular indoor venue like an auditorium, you should take into consideration the acoustic parameters of the location in order to incorporate the various adjustments needed in volume, equalization, treble, bass, and other effects. House mix can significantly improve the sound quality produced inside an auditorium, especially, during concerts or musical plays. However, you can never use a house mix when recording the audio of such event as its use could significantly diminish the audio quality.


Digital mixers usually have a number of the descriptor that describes their input-output functions. A three-number descriptor like that of the 24:8:2 indicates the number of inputs, output buses, and master output channels, respectively. A two-number descriptor, on the other hand, indicates the absence of output bus. Presonus studiolive, Allen & Heath and Behringer x32 are the some of the most popular and high-end mixers you can easily spotted on the live concert.


Live sound mixers are called sound system mixers or PA mixers. If you are a performing musician and are looking for a digital audio mixer for live sound, you can check out the following most recommended digital mixers for live sound:



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