Friday, March 6, 2015

Syracuse Coach Jim Boeheim Penalized

Bad news for +Syracuse University coach +Jim Boeheim. The NCAA on Friday suspended  Syracuse  basketball coach Jim Boeheim for nine ACC games, took away 12 scholarships and ordered that 108 wins be vacated as a result of a multiyear investigation into the university’s athletic programs.

Syracuse’s penalties also include a five-year probation and the vacating of all wins in which ineligible men’s basketball student-athletes played during the 2004-07 and 2010-12 seasons, and in which ineligible football student-athletes played in 2004, 2005 and 2006.

The school must vacate 108 wins — the most ever taken away from a program, according to Syracuse.com. As a result, Boeheim — who had only needed 34 wins to join Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski as the only coaches to reach 1,000 career wins — is left with 858, which drops him to sixth on the all-time list.

“Improper institutional involvement and influence in a student’s academic work in order to gain or maintain eligibility is a violation of NCAA rules and a violation of the most fundamental core values of the NCAA and higher education,” the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions wrote in its decision. “The behavior in this case, which placed the desire to achieve success on the basketball court over academic integrity, demonstrated clearly misplaced institutional priorities.”

In 2012, Syracuse declared former center Fab Melo ineligible for the NCAA tournament days before it started. Melo also missed three Big East games during the season because of an academic issue. Early in the 2012-13 season, former forward James Southerland sat out six games for an academic issue but helped lead the Orange to the Final Four.

The committee also found that from 2001-09, the school did not follow its own written policies and procedures for students who tested positive for banned substances. NCAA rules require that if schools have a drug-testing policy, it must include substances on the banned list and the school must follow its policy. Syracuse had a written policy, but both Boeheim and athletic director Daryl Gross admitted they did not follow it.